Twenty-four panels of reflective bronze featuring a two-dimensional depiction of horses, birds, and male angels circled around a shining sun.

Jean-Théodore Dupas, Chariot of Aurora, 1935, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of Frederick R. Koch.

Jean Dunand, Jean Dupas, and Gioachino Rossini
Fri., Feb. 18 | Sun., Feb. 20

“The language of music is common to all generations and nations; it is understood by everybody, since it is understood with the heart.”

Gioachino Rossini

Carnegie Museum of Art is delighted to bring you artwork from our collection whose stories and themes connect with the sounds you will hear from the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. We hope you enjoy experiencing this work of art alongside the performance.

The dawn played a significant role in both sight and sound for the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini and Swiss and French designers Jean Dunand and Jean Dupas. Aurora, the mythical goddess of morning, commands her horses across the massive sculptural relief that was once installed on the luxury ocean liner Normandie. Rossini’s Overture begins slowly as a reference to dawn and builds with the anticipation of an approaching storm.

Learn more about the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

Twenty-four panels of reflective bronze featuring a two-dimensional depiction of horses, birds, and male angels circled around a shining sun.
Jean-Théodore Dupas, Chariot of Aurora, 1935, Carnegie Museum of Art. Gift of Frederick R. Koch.