Is It Morning For You Yet?58th Carnegie International


58th Carnegie International Prize Winners

The Carnegie Prize

The Carnegie Prize is a long running tradition at Carnegie Museum of Art, as old as the Carnegie International itself. LaToya Ruby Frazier received the Carnegie Prize for her work in the 58th Carnegie International, More Than Conquerors: A Monument for Community Health Workers of Baltimore, Maryland. Born in Braddock, Pennsylvania, and based in Chicago, Frazier uses photography to tell the stories of community health workers in Baltimore during the pandemic. Stemming from workshops as part of a participatory research study led by Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity, Frazier’s installation centers health workers and their voices. Frazier’s monument dedicated to the community health workers of Baltimore reconceptualizes what a monument can be. The Carnegie Prize includes a Medal of Honor, designed by Tiffany & Co. and cast by J. E. Caldwell & Co., and was first issued to Winslow Homer at the 1896 international.

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Installation view of LaToya Ruby Frazier, More than Conquerors: A Monument for the Community Health Workers of Baltimore, Maryland, 2021-22, at Carnegie Museum of Art, 2022; photo: Sean Eaton

The Fine Prize

Malcolm Peacock’s The insistent desire for and impossibility of being and Hyphen—’s As if there is no sun were both awarded the 2022 Fine Prize. Hyphen— is a Yogyakarta-based collective with members Akmalia Rizqita, Grace Samboh, and Ratna Mufida, who are dedicated to piecing together Indonesian art history through research, archiving, publishing, hosting residencies, making exhibitions, generating discussions, and conversations. Hyphen—’s presentation within the 58th Carnegie International places the life and work of painter Kustiya (1934–2012), an understudied yet important art historical figure in Indonesia, among her contemporaries. Born in Raleigh, North Carolina, and based in New Orleans, Louisiana, Malcolm Peacock is interested in the intricacies of intimacy and examines emotional and psychic spaces of Black subjects. For his 58th Carnegie International contribution, he brings together a diverse group of Black individuals for a work experienced by one visitor at a time. The presentation asks whether art museums can offer the conditions to cultivate a means of holding space inside a future in which Black autonomy is uncontested. His work is being presented on select days throughout the run of the exhibition that mark significant events in Black American history. The Fine Prize was established in 2008 as part of a gift made by the Fine Foundation in support of the Carnegie International.

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Installation view of Hyphen—, As if there were no sun, at Carnegie Museum of Art, featuring works by Kustiyah, 2022; photo: Sean Eaton
Malcolm Peacock, courtesy of the artist

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