Is It Morning For You Yet?58th Carnegie International


Antonio Martorell

Antonio Martorell (b. 1939, Santurce; lives in La Playa de Ponce) has been artist-in-residence for more than 30 years at the University of Puerto Rico in Cayey. He keeps busy at painting, drawing, installation and performance art, graphics, set and costume design, theater, films, TV, radio, writing for the press, and has published four books. He is a host of the WIPR-TV program En la punta de la lengua. This television series has won five Emmy Awards. For more than three decades, he has been a co-host with Rosa Luisa Márquez in the radio program 1,2,3 Probando on Radio Universidad de Puerto Rico. His work has been exhibited and awarded in and out of the country and is represented in private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, NY; the Whitney Museum, NY; the NY Historical Society; El Museo del Barrio, NY; the Library of Congress; the National Portrait Gallery; the Latino Art Collection of the Smithsonian, Washington, DC; the Princeton University Library; National Museum of Puerto Rican Arts & Culture; Block Museum of Art; Northwestern University, Chicago; Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, NY; Princeton University Library, NJ; Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico; Casa de Las Américas, Cuba; Museo de Arte de Ponce; Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña; Museo UPR, Río Piedras and Cayey; La Casa del Libro; Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, PR; among others. He is a member of the Academia Puertorriqueña de la Lengua Española. As a writer, Martorell is the author of the memoir La piel de la memoria (1991)(translated as Memory’s Tattoo by Andrew Hurley), El libro dibujado/El dibujo librado (1995), El velorio (no-vela)(Martorell’s Wake) (2010),in a bilingual edition with English translation by Andrew Hurley, which is a fictionalized commentary of the iconic 19th-century painting, El velorio, by the Puerto Rican Francisco Oller and his latest book, Pierdencuentra (2019) and Los colores de Tó (2021). He is the author of the Veveviejo texts, adapted for the theater by Rosa Luisa Márquez and performed by her and himself. He is the subject of Paloma Suau’s prize-winning feature documentary film El accidente feliz (2019).