Crash Course: Art History from Ancient to Now (Wednesday Morning Session)

CMOA Theater

$216, members $168, students $100


Interested in an evening session? We also offer this course from 6–8 p.m. on Thursdays!

In this rare opportunity, knowledgeable, engaging scholars hand-picked by Carnegie Museum of Art guide you through the famous, the infamous, the mysterious, and the yet-to-be-discovered. You’ll learn about art and artists from ancient times through our contemporary moment. It’s a 12-week crash course covering hundreds of years of human creativity unlike any other. Participants get access to museum galleries after each session.

Interested in a particular subject or period? We’ve divided the course into digestible, four-week classes. Enroll in the full course for a big discount.

  • The Art and Architecture of the Ancient Mediterranean
  • Late Medieval Art through France and the Rococo Style
  • The Impressionists through the Art of Our Time

The world of art is within your reach. Just please don’t touch the art.

 

About the instructors

Dr. Carrie Weaver teaches The Art and Architecture of the Ancient Mediterranean. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a classical archaeologist, specializing in the ancient Mediterranean world, with an emphasis on funerary art and architecture, burial practices, and the analysis of human bone. She has excavated in Pompeii and Sicily, and studied human remains from the United Kingdom, Rome, Sicily, and Turkey. She is the author of The Bioarchaeology of Classical Kamarina: Life and Death in Greek Sicily (University Press of Florida, 2015), and the results of her research have been published in The American Journal of Archaeology, The Journal of Roman Archaeology, The Journal of Greek Archaeology, and The International Journal of Osteoarchaeology.

Dr. Saskia Beranek teaches Late Medieval Art through France and the Rococo Style. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh, having previously also taught at Duquesne, St. Vincent’s, and Carlow. She is a specialist in seventeenth century Dutch art, architecture, and garden design and has spent most of the last decade researching Amalia van Solms, Princess of Orange—one of the most significant Dutch female patrons of the day. Her interests lie in portraits and where and when they were displayed. She has presented this research at a range of conferences in the United States, the Netherlands, Germany, and the UK, and has authored an article examining the portrait gallery as a site of display in Dutch seventeenth century elite residences.

 

Share your passion for art! Become a docent!

Individuals wishing to enter the provisional CMOA volunteer docent program are required to take this 12-week course. For details on our volunteer docent program visit cmoa.org/get-involved/docents. Questions? Contact Hattie Lehman, Assistant Curator of Education, at lehmanh@cmoa.org.